Flexible Dieting Macro Calculator

Ultimate Macro Calculator

This macro calculator shows your optimal macronutrients and calories based on your age, height, weight, gender, and activity level. Use your results with macro counting or flexible dieting/IIFYM to lose fat or gain muscle.

Age

Gender

Current Weight

Height

Formula ?If you know your body fat %, Lean Mass formula may be more accurate.

Activity Level

Goal

Carbohydrate

Protein

Fat

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MEALS PER DAY

ADJUST PROTEIN

Why Macros are Important

The foods we eat are made up of three “macros” (macronutrients). These macros are carbohydrates (carbs), protein, and fat. Chicken is high in the protein macro but has no carbs. Rice is high in carbs, but very little fat or protein.

These 3 macronutrients (macros) are from which the human body obtains energy and raw materials for growth and repair.

What Are the Right Macros for You?

The right macros for you are based on your personal Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE) and goals.

Our macro calculator defaults at the best macro ratio that’s proven to work for the most number of people. You should achieve your goals using the default setting.

However, there is nothing wrong with adjusting this ratio if needed. Perhaps you’re an extreme endomorph and do better with fewer carbs. Or, perhaps you only have one kidney and need to eat less protein. You can adjust the macros to levels that are right for you personally with a little math, which is explained in detail here.

How to Calculate the Right Daily Protein Amount

Setting protein to Moderate adjusts the ratio to .65 grams per pound of body weight. This is appropriate for sedentary individuals or for people with higher body fat percentages.

High is appropriate for people who are active, do moderate strength training, and have an average body fat percentage.

Maximum will set to 1 gram / lb. This is appropriate for those who are wanting to gain weight/muscle mass and do intense training.

We go into greater detail about how to choose an appropriate protein level when counting macros so give that article a read if you’re still unsure.

Using the Macro Calculator to Calculate Daily Fat Amount

Fats are set at 30% of daily energy expenditure. This is a healthy moderate amount that most people do well with and is based on recommendations by nutritional guidelines.

When choosing foods that contain fat, focus on getting predominately healthy fats as part of that 30%.

Using the Calculator to Calculate the Right Carb Amount

After protein and fat are calculated, the calculator assigns the remainder of your calories as carbohydrates. This usually results in a moderate amount of carbs that are in the healthy range recommended for most people. Carbs fuel your body and workouts and are the body’s preferred energy source.

Many people coming from a “low carb” type of dieting may feel like this calculator calculates carbs on the high side. However, this is a moderate amount of carbs according to respected nutritional guidelines and the notion that carbs cause weight gain or prevent fat loss when eaten in relation to your TDEE has been debunked.

How the Calculator Adjusts Your TDEE Based on Your Goals

Daily energy expenditure (TDEE) is calculated from your age, gender, height, weight, and exercise output.

You can easily use the macro calculator to adjust your energy levels to lose fat, maintain your current weight, or gain muscle.

By default, the results are for losing weight. Select either lose or gain if you are trying to lose fat or gain muscle. These are good starting points, but you may have to play around with your macros until you find your personal goal-reaching sweet spot. You can then count macros until you reach your desired goal.

See the full guide to macro ratios here.

Setting the Calculator for Weight Loss (Fat Loss)

  • The Lose button puts you in a 20% calorie deficit which promotes safe, steady weight loss.
  • The Lose 10% button puts you in a 10% calorie deficit and is intended for those with less than 10 pounds to lose and who also wish to build muscle at the same time.

For Maintaining Your Current Weight

The Maintain button shows you the macro levels that will keep you at your current weight. This is good for people who have lost weight and who don’t want to gain the weight back.

Settings for Gaining Weight or Building Muscle

The Gain button puts you in a 20% calorie surplus and is designed for people who are wanting to build muscle fast in conjunction with a comprehensive weight training program. It can also be used by people who are underweight.

Some people may want to use the maintenance button and then gradually increase calories from there if they want their muscle gains to be lean.

Which Formula – Normal or Lean Mass?

The default (normal) formula is fine for most people. However, there are some exceptions.

1. If you are very lean (low body fat percentage) the default formula may not be accurate. Use the “Lean Body Mass” setting. This uses a formula that factors specific body fat percentage into the equation and since muscle tissue burns many more calories than fat tissue while even at rest, it will give you a higher TDEE. This is perfect for “athletic body types” that want to use macro counting to gain more muscle mass.

2. If you are classified as obese and have a lot of weight to lose, the standard formula will not be accurate because the equation used, factors for an average body fat percentage. If you happen to be above average it will skew the results. Please see this article for more clarification on how to do macro counting if you are obese.

You can calculate your ideal body weight here.

How Do I Calculate My Daily Macros

By default, the results show the number of grams of each macronutrient you should eat each day. Simply make sure you have eaten those macro amounts by the end of the day.

How Do I Calculate My Macros for a Meal

Click on meal numbers to split this into a “per meal” basis for counting macros. For some people, this is easier, while for others it becomes too much to keep track of. Do what works for you. Either method is fine.

See our Healthy 5 Day Flexible Meal Plan. It includes 3 meals and 2 snacks per day.

Setting Activity Level Accurately

A higher activity level means a higher daily calorie goal (TDEE). For example; if you can maintain your weight at 2,000 calories per day, then adding vigorous daily exercise to this means you need more calories to maintain your weight.

Figure out your activity level using the Calories Burned Calculator.

The same rule applies even if your goal is to lose weight.

If you are sedentary and your goal is to lose weight, your calorie goal might be (for example) 1,600 calories per day. If you decide to start exercising, the calculator will increase your daily calorie goal (say, to 1,800 calories/day). Although it may seem counter-intuitive, more energy is required to fuel your workouts, and your metabolism is increased – therefore calories should be higher.

Many people struggle with which exercise level to choose. Basically each level breaks down as follows:

  • Sedentary: Just normal everyday activity like a little walking, a couple flights of stairs, eating etc.
  • Light: Any activity that burns an additional 200-400 calories for females or 250-500 calories for a males more than your sedentary amount.
  • Moderate: Any activity that burns an additional 400-650 calories for females or 500-800 calories for males more than your sedentary amount.
  • Extreme: Any activity that burns more than about 650 calories for females or more than 800 calories for males in addition to your sedentary amount.

This varies based on your individual stats, but you can get a more specific amount of calorie burn by simply subtracting your sedentary calorie amount from the chosen exercise level amount.

You also need to determine how many calories you are burning: For this use our exercise calorie burn MET database or a good app like MapMyFitness or a wearable device like FitBit or Apple Watch. (Note that activity trackers tend to overestimate calorie burn.)

Too much physical activity combined with low calories could lead to muscle catabolism (the breakdown of muscle fiber). This is not a good thing, and can actually stall your weight loss, so if you love to exercise, eat up!

Which App is Best for Tracking Macros?

After you have your personal macro calculations, you need to determine the macros in all the foods you eat. By tracking and counting them each day, you can reach your recommended macro targets that encourage fat loss, muscle gain, or whatever your goal may be.

While this may seem like a lot of work, there are some really good smartphone macro apps that do most of the work for you. We rank the best macro tracking apps here so you can get started tracking quickly.

Macro counting is extremely successful, and can free you from the “good food, bad food” mindset.

You don’t need to make radical shifts in your diet, nor deprive yourself of your favorite foods. Just make sure you are within your macro counts for each day, and you’re good to go!

You'll Love My Macro Solution Program

Step-by-step ebooks, or fully customized personal macros coaching. Now with complete vegan edition.

References

  • Mifflin, M. D., St Jeor, S. T., Hill, L. A., Scott, B. J., Daugherty, S. A., & Koh, Y. O. (1990). A new predictive equation for resting energy expenditure in healthy individuals. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 51 (2), 241-247. Link
  • McArdle, W. D., Katch, F. I., & Katch, V. L. (2010). Exercise physiology: nutrition, energy, and human performance. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Link
  • Lemon, P. W., Tarnopolsky, M. A., MacDougall, J. D., & Atkinson, S. A. (1992). Protein requirements and muscle mass/strength changes during intensive training in novice bodybuilders. Journal of Applied Physiology, 73(2), 767-775. study abstract link
  • Grundy, S. M. (1999). The optimal ratio of fat-to-carbohydrate in the diet. Annual review of nutrition, 19(1), 325-341. abstract
Ted Kallmyer is an ISSA certified Specialist in Fitness Nutrition and is our lead macro coach. If you need help reaching your weight loss/fitness goals see our personal coaching options.
Last Updated: June 11, 2020

1,871 Comments

  1. Lori

    Hi Ted,
    I was wondering, for nursing mom’s, would we calculate this differently?

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Lori, Yes, you would need to add an additional 300-400 calories to your TDEE and then proportioned to your macros at the percentages given.

      Reply
  2. Aimee

    Hi Ted!

    Reply
    • Aimee

      Okay hit send before I meant to.

      Anyways, I first found your site about 6 or 7 months ago and saw some great results but they have slowed down and I can’t seem to lose anymore body fat. I am not looking to lose “Weight” but more body fat and build muscle. I am 26 years old, 115lbs, 62 inches, I do Kayla Itsiness BBG Program, and according to my fitbit I burn around 2,000 calories a day (I usually hit at least 10k steps everyday even though I have a desk job.) On average I eat about 1650 cals a day. On days I do a HIIT workout or heavy lifting should I choose moderate activity instead of light and then use light activity on the days I do LISS?

      Thank you!

      Aimee

      Reply
      • Ted

        Hi Aimee, Great! I would say at 5′ 2″ you are pretty much at your optimal weight which is why your results have slowed. Secondly, have you measured your body fat percentage? Women in general, will have trouble getting to a really low percentage because of hormones etc. In my experience, the only women that really achieve a cut physique are those that do fitness as their full-time job or have a genetic predisposition to that body type. Thirdly, I find fitbit almost always overestimates calorie burn for its users. 2000 calories is a lot unless, again, you are a training athlete and are spending hours each day exercising. I had a quick look at Kayla’s program and if you want to start building muscle you’ll probably have to transition over to a comprehensive weight training program that will provide more stimulation to your muscle groups while doing less cardio. You’ll also have to increase your calories and be in less of a deficit to encourage muscle growth. Have a read of my article here as well. https://healthyeater.com/gain-muscle-lose-fat-iifym (also note the body fat percentage chart on that page)

        Reply
  3. Jessica

    Hi Ted, I am just looking to see if my numbers are correct. I am 26 168lbs 65 inches. I am a stay at home mother. I do crossfit 3-4x a week. I am looking to loose weight. I selected moderate activity, loose and high protien. Are those selections correct? Also thank you for this site. I appreciate it. I’m extremely new to nutrition and high intensity workouts like crossfit.

    Thank you

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Jessica, You’re welcome I’m glad we could help. I got 1866 calories 182g carbs, 168 g protein 52 g fat for your CrossFit days. On days you don’t do CrossFit cut back to your sedentary macros or lightly active if you are pretty active with your kid(s) throughout the day. Please check out my book also as it offers a lot of help with flexible dieting and the nutritional aspects involved. All the best! https://healthyeater.com/ebook

      Reply
      • Jessica

        Thank you very much! I will be sure to check it out!!

        Reply
  4. Zoe

    Hey Ted! I´m very glad I found IIFYM and specially this site, I´m so tired of crazy restrictive diets…Just calculated my macros and wanted to check if they sounded good to you. I´m 29 years old,1.60 meters and 62 kilos, jus started the Kayla Itsiness BBG Program, where you workout 6 days a week, 3 of them 50 minutes of fast pase incline walking and 3 sessions of resistance training (that always make me sweat a ton and are really hard). I want to burn fat and build muscle. So I got on active days 1445 cal C:135 P:136 F:40 and on rest days 1259 cal C:100 P:136 F:36. This sounds amazing to me because it will allow me to eat more, 1000 cal a day is just too litlle :/ So thanks a lot for your help, I´ll be buying your book for sure just to be more educated on this subject 🙂

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Zoe, Welcome and I’m glad you found us too. Your numbers look good, but since you’re trying to build muscle you may want to go with moderately active. You are a bit borderline between the two but this will help you be in less of a calorie deficit which is better for muscle development. Thanks for checking out my book and all the best with getting started!

      Reply
      • Zoe

        Thanks for getting back to me, I`ll adjust that 🙂

        Reply
  5. Jenny G

    Hey Ted!

    I’m 30 years old, 5’10 and weigh around 190. I teach 3 and 4 years old, am constantly up and down during the day, walking around the classroom or playground. My goals are to lose weight and gain muscle. After work I head to the gym doing 30 minutes or cardio and weights 6 days a week. What activity level should I choose and should I choose lose or gain for my goal? I just want to make sure I am choosing the best options to get the best results.

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Jenny, I think moderate activity would be safe. Select high protein but definitely select lose. You won’t lose any fat unless you are in a calorie deficit. Be sure to check out my book as well. Tons of useful stuff in there to guide and help you be successful. https://healthyeater.com/ebook

      Reply
  6. Eric Clarke

    Hi Ted,

    I’m 20 years old. 5’9. 165-170 ish. I would like to lose bodyfat but keep my muscle. High protein diet. I want to be lean with size. My activity would be moderate. I chose lose, and high protein diet. What would you suggest?

    Reply
  7. carrie powell

    Hey Ted!
    I just want to make sure this is right…im 29 female 5’4 and weigh 141 – I’m usually on the go throughout the day and I workout 6 times a week for at least 50 min. (crossfit, turbo kick, weight training, with HITT and circuit type stuff) are my carbs suppose to be in the 200 range? Sounds great!!! but of course I don’t want to go too high and also for females do you recommend a lb per body weight for protein when lifting weights at least 4 times a week – so 140 for protein? and fat no more that 150? Thanks so much!!
    Carrie

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Carrie, It looks like you should be safe with moderate activity and IIFYM isn’t a low carb diet so the 200 range is correct. Since you’re doing so much strength training you are good with doing high protein. As for the fat, you should be at 46 g per day but if you go with very active you’d be at 52 g per day.

      Reply
      • carrie powell

        Thanks for getting back to me! I meant to say 50 on fat, not 150! 🙂
        I also meant to share I’m trying to drop 10lbs… would that change my carb intake. Thanks for letting me know my fat intake…so fat intake all depends on your daily activity? I was taking in 57, but I’ll drop it to 46.

        Reply
        • Ted

          Sure, happy to help. Nope, keep carbs where they’re at. Since you only have 10 pounds to lose, on a rest day you should be eating at your “sedentary” macro amounts. Good luck and please check out my book. https://healthyeater.com/ebook

          Reply
  8. Nikki Sands

    Hi Ted! I’ve worked with a coach in the past who introduced me to IIFYM, and I have loved it ever since. Your website is great and makes it easy to calculate my necessary macros for now. However, do you have any suggestions on carb cycling? Previously I had at least one high card day per week, but I’m unsure as to how to calculate how many more carbs I should be consuming on that day. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Nikki, Thanks, glad you found us. I don’t think carb cycling is necessary unless it is done with purpose. Randomly picking a day out of the week to eat more carbs doesn’t have a physiological purpose. But, consuming more on workout days and less on rest days seems to be beneficial in fueling workouts but also encouraging fat loss on rest days. This is tied to your TDEE which is higher for workout days and less for rest days. So, you could have an exercise set of macros and a sedentary set of macros using the calculator, that way you’ll be eating more carbs during workout days and less during rest days.

      Reply
      • Nikki Sands

        Thanks for the response. I will do a test run of tailoring my macros to fit my activity on varying days. I appreciate the information!

        Reply
  9. Johnny Cao

    Hello Ted, I’ve stumbled onto your website while researching flex dieting. Great stuff! I’m 26 years old and weigh 218.5 lbs with about 19% body fat. My goal is to drop body fat to about 14% and keep my lean muscle. What would be your suggestion in reaching this goal? Thanks Ted.

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Johnny, Welcome! Use the calculator above and select high protein and “lose” after you have entered the other details. You should also have a comprehensive weight training program in place. Be sure to check out my book: https://healthyeater.com/ebook

      Reply
  10. Katy Marren

    This group of articles is so helpful! It sounds like what I’ve been doing sort of intuitively but according to that calculator, I should be eating more carbs – I could stand to lose at least 10 pounds. So my question is what are good carbs? All I can come up with are things like pasta and bread, starchy foods that tend to leave me feeling tired, or bloated if I eat too much.

    Any tips would be great!

    Reply
  11. mkepainter

    Hi there, I’m 44 yrs old, 5’4″ and weighing in at 160lbs. I’m very active, and have been for years—I run 2-4x per week, am a roller derby player, and do circuit training as well for strength. When I decided a couple months ago to try and shed 25lbs, I started by calculating my BMR at approximately 1300 cals. I’ve been eating healthy, wholesome foods, never exceeding 1300 cals (journaling my food intake religiously), and burning about 500-700 cals per day except on weekly rest day. So even though I’m running at a consistent deficit, no weight is coming off! Not even a pound, in three weeks! I’m feeling strong and have great endurance, but this is the stubbornnest fat EVER 🙂 Using your calculator, it says I ought to be consuming 1689 cals a day, which seems far too high, especially if I’m not reducing as it is. What am I missing?

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi there, It’s simple, you aren’t eating enough to support all your movement and your metabolism and this has caused your body to enter starvation mode. Please see my article here on the subject here. https://healthyeater.com/eat-to-lose-weight

      Reply
      • mkepainter

        I guess I’m just questioning the logic of this. If starvation looked like me, then how do we explain the emaciated bodies of prisoners of war, refugees, or participants on “Survivor”? Not that anyone is striving for that fearful condition of malnutrition, obviously… but common sense tells us that starvation leads to weight loss. So, backing away from that extreme example, my question remains… if I increase my calorie intake, then I lessen the deficit between calories burned and calories consumed, which means by my logic, I would guess my path to reduction would be slowed down. Isn’t there a point at which the body stops panicking, sees the 1300 (or fewer) calories as “the new normal,” and starts consuming its own fat stores for energy? How do we get that engine running?

        Reply
        • Ted

          Yes, that is true with cases of extreme deficiency, but you are giving your body just enough to keep it functioning while not using its fat reserves. If you want to lose weight in a healthy and sustainable way, you have to start eating more. This is what our calculator and flexible dieting are designed to do. You have to support your metabolism and your exercise with enough calories and as I pointed out in my article, science backs this up. You get the engine running by feeding it fuel.

          Reply
          • mkepainter

            Thanks Ted!

          • Ted

            You’re so welcome! Check back in a few weeks from now and let me know how increasing your calories has helped break the plateau.

  12. Shannon

    Ted, I’m a 23 year old female, 5’4. I currently weigh 122. I weight lift 5-6 times per week and mix in 30 mins of cardio 2-3 days a week. My lifts are generally muscle isolation lifts/different muscle group each day and last for 60-80 mins. I deadlift heavy and squat heavy once a week, each. I’m trying to maintain my current weight while burning fat and gaining muscle. I’ve been tracking my macros for about 2 weeks now. My current macros are 140p / 231c / 50f. I’m very new to tracking and just wanted your opinion on whether or not I’m on the right track for my goals with these macros! I’m a police officer, so my activity level at work varies each day. I can be very active, or spend about 6 of 10 hours in a car. All this into consideration, do you think I’d be in the moderately active or very active category?

    Reply
  13. Christy

    Hi Ted, so glad I found your site! I am a 31 year old female, 110lbs, 5’3″. I participate in boot camp 3 days a week, with one-two additional days weight training. I work at a desk job. I’m really trying to add muscle to my frame. Which activity level should I use to calculate my macros? Thank you for your help!

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Christy, Me too! Welcome. It’s a bit hard to estimate because I don’t know the duration of both your boot camp and your weight training sessions. Also, with the weight training it’s helpful to also describe your basic program. Thanks 🙂

      Reply
      • Christy

        Thanks for your response Ted! The boot camp is 1 hour per day, for 3 days a week. Two of those days are typically AMRAP-style workouts, with the third day usually a strength training circuit with dumbbells or body weight movements. I’ve just started doing the weight training on my own, usually for an hour. I’m starting with bench presses, dead lifts, squats, assisted pull-ups, split squats, etc. Basically whatever I feel like doing that day. Thanks again for your help!

        Reply
        • Ted

          Thanks, I think it would be pretty safe to classify that as “moderate” then.

          Reply
          • Christy

            Great! Thank you so much!

  14. Denise

    Hi … I’m a 45 year old female and I run trails 6 days a week logging 50-70 miles… A week .. Im weighing in at 121 and would love to be 100 lbs for my next marathon.Please suggestions!!!
    Denise

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Denise, Is 100 lbs a healthy body weight based on your stats?

      Reply
  15. Shema

    Hi. i am a 38 year old female who is 5’3 weighs 180lbs. I am would like to lose 40-50 lbs. for the last two months I workout for 60 min half cardio and half weight training 4-5 days a week. Typically burning between 350-400 calories but my job has me sitting most of the day. Should I choose sedentary or lightly active? Also I ran macros this is obtained C-1614 Carbs-154 Protein-149 Fat-45 with light activity does this sound correct for my goal? Thank you

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Shema, Yes, light activity is correct and your macros look correct as well. You may want to also have a sedentary set of macros to use during your rest days. For more help and tips please see my Flexible Dieting ebook. https://healthyeater.com/ebook All the best!

      Reply
  16. alison

    Hi. I am a 36 year old female 150 lbs and 61 inches, trying to lose weight in the mid section mostly, but also trying to gain muscle. I lift weights mostly and not much cardio, would I choose lose or gain?

    Reply
  17. Kathy C

    Should I select Maintain if I am using MFP to track my activities? Or do I use the Lose option?

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Kathy, you would select “sedentary” and “lose”.

      Reply
  18. Stephanie

    Hello Ted,
    I was searching for “macros” and came across your site. I am a 49 year old female, 5″6 and weigh 144 lbs. I am trying to lose 10lbs and lean out. I work out 4-5 times a week, lifting weights and cardio.

    Any help/advice is more than welcomed,

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Stephanie, glad you found us! I would advise you to enter your stats above and come up with a TDEE and macro amounts that will promote healthy weight loss. Since you don’t have much weight to lose, you also would want to have a “sedentary” set of macros to use during your rest days. For more help and the ins and outs of counting macros see my book as well as our members only support forum here. https://healthyeater.com/ebook

      Reply
  19. Mel

    Hi Ted,
    So happy to have found this site!
    Over the past year, I followed the Dukan Diet (very low carb/low fat) and lost 25 lbs. After loosening up the reins, I have unfortunately gained back about 5-6 lbs and would love to lose those (plus another 5-10, if possible), but cannot fathom the idea of restricting food groups again. Cue IIFYM.
    Current stats: 25 y/o F, 5’0″, 128 lbs. I participate in group fitness classes 5-6 times per week (burning ~350 calories/class according to my Polar watch/chest strap). According to the calculator, I should be at 1373 cal, 152C, 106P, 38F. Just wanted to run all of this by you, the professional! Does this sound right to you? Looking forward to diving in!

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Mel, Glad you found us, The Dukan Diet doesn’t sound fun at all! I just ran your numbers and I got the same, so you’re all good there. I would also recommend that you calculate a set of sedentary macros to follow on your rest day(s). This can help accelerate your results. All the best with getting started and keep me posted on your progress.

      Reply
      • Mel

        Thanks so much, Ted! Happy New Year!

        Reply
  20. Gina

    Hi Ted,
    I need some desperate help. 🙁 I have been hearing so much on flexible dieting and I want to try it. But was having a hard time figuring out my macros. I found your site and so far it seems pretty good. I just want to make sure that I understand all of this. So I am 44 years old, female, currently weighing in at 220 pounds. I am five feet five inches in height. Currently I am not exercising at all. However, I want to change all of that.

    So just to lose weight, is this calculator telling me that I eat 116g c, 181 p, and 44g f? Meaning if I shoot to eat within those numbers every day I can lose weight without working out? But then when I do start working out, do those numbers adjust?

    My goal is I am over weight obviously, actually according to the BMI I am obese. My goal would be to lose 2 lbs a week. I want to be lean, so how do I achieve this? If I am over weight, can I just start lifting the heavy weights and eating the calculations I mentioned above? Also I was an avid gym rat, so I am not new to exercising, I just let life get in the way, put me last and gained 30 lbs back from the beginning of June. I need to get back to being healthy and happy, but I just need a starting point. I get confused and do better with someone telling me, “Gina this is what you need to do to start, eat this amount of carbs, etc. and work out this much doing this”….I can do better when I am have someone guiding me at first. Can you help?
    Thank you,
    Gina

    Reply
    • Ted

      Hi Gina, I’m so glad you found our site. Yes, eat those macros and you’ll be in a healthy calorie deficit for weight loss. I would say a pound a week is a more realistic goal but some weeks you may lose two. When you start working out, you’ll have to readjust your macros based on the amount of exercise you are doing each day. Check out my book which explains everything in detail and we have a member’s only forum where I’m standing by to answer any question you have along the way! Good luck and happy holidays! Book link: https://healthyeater.com/ebook

      Reply