Power Eggs: Low Carb and Loaded with Nutrition

power-eggs-recipe

As part of my low carb diet, I’ve had to ditch my steel cut oatmeal and eat more eggs for breakfast.

However, I know if I just eat eggs without bread, I’m usually hungry again in about 30 minutes, plus I would be missing the fiber and antioxidants I receive from my wild blueberry and tart cherry oatmeal.

Therefore, I came up with Power Eggs; a high protein, high fiber, highly nutritious version of scrambled eggs.

Here’s how to make enough for 2 people. (I make some for myself and send my partner off to work with the other half)

Power Egg Ingredients

  • 4 jumbo or extra large organic eggs
  • ½ a red onion chopped
  • 1 cup cubed yellow squash
  • 4 mini sweet peppers
  • 2 cups chopped lacinato kale
  • ½ cup frozen wild blueberries (or fresh in season)
  • 1 medium ripe avocado
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • Garlic salt and black pepper to taste

power-egg-ingredients

Here’s How To Make This Recipe

I’m old fashioned and chop all of the following by hand, but if you have one of those handy dandy food choppers then feel free.

1. Rinse and chop all the vegetables to a size in which they’ll cook quickly.

Tip: I always de-stem my kale. Some people complain that kale gives them gas and this is usually from the tough fiber in the stem that causes this, so I eliminate it.

2. Heat the coconut oil in a large non-stick skillet or wok. Add chopped veggies and sauté until they soften to your preference. (About 5-7 minutes for me.)

3. About a minute before you add the eggs, add the blueberries, garlic salt, and black pepper.

4. Add the eggs and gently scramble into the veggies.

Tip: Some people are afraid of whole eggs. But whole eggs are far more nutritious than egg whites. Check out this nice infographic to see a comparison.

5. Cook until the eggs are firm to your liking.

6. Slice the avocado, divide power eggs into two equal portions, and plate. Garnish with 1/2 of the avocado on each portion.

7. Serve and devour!

cooking-power-eggs

Variations

You really can add any of your favorite veggies to this recipe and feel free to experiment with different combinations.

I live next to a Mexican farmers market and often put nopal cactus and cilantro in this recipe for an added twist.

Just shoot to make your Power Eggs as colorful as possible to get the most antioxidant benefit.

Yeah, about the blueberries; Some my find this strange, but trust me, they are hardly noticeable yet provide a lot of antioxidants.

Tip: I always buy wild blueberries because they have just about double the antioxidants of cultivated blueberries.

You can also top this power eggs recipe with a little hot sauce of your choice for even more flavor variation.

Basic Nutrition of Power Eggs

This is per serving, based on two servings. Some may actually get 3 servings out of this recipe.

  • Calories: 353.2
  • Fat: 16.8 grams
  • Carbs: 29 grams
  • Fiber: 11 grams
  • Net Carbs 18 grams
  • Protein: 21.5 grams

If you have any questions about my Power Eggs recipe, please ask below.

Also, you are welcome to share recipe variations with us as well.

Comments

  • http://www.healthyeater.com/ Dan Bolton

    This looks awesome!
    I’ve almost exclusively eaten eggs for breakfast these last couple of years.
    I used to strictly be a toast or cereal boy but since I’ve made the change I haven’t looked back.

    I’ve gotta try these sometime – Thanks for sharing!

    • http://www.caffeineinformer.com/ Ted

      You’re welcome Dan. It’s pretty crazy how much a western diet revolves around gains and they are usually laced with sugar. Historically eggs have been given a bad rap, but I think it’s actually the flour and sugar that causes the health problems plus they do little to really fuel and nourish the body.

      • Michele

        I cook with coconut oil as it doesn’t denature with heat and eat salads with olive oil as it shouldn’t be heated. Grape seed oil I understand can also be heated but I don’t use it

        • http://www.caffeineinformer.com/ Ted

          Olive oil can be heated but just not past its smoke point.

  • Sue

    Very nice! And, if you switch the coconut oil to 2 tsp of olive oil, use half the avocado, ditch the yolks and double the number of egg whites, you’ll have an awesome anti-inflammatory meal. Yolks are also rich in arachidonic acid, a direct cause of inflammation at the cellular level.

    • http://www.caffeineinformer.com/ Ted

      I would have to disagree about the yolks, they are loaded with nutrition. Did you see my link to the infographic? Also coconut oil isn’t an inflammatory oil. To each his/her own though 🙂

      • Sue

        The arachidonic acid in the yolks trumps the nutritional benefits. Coconut oil is rich in short- chain fatty acids which can bind to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and induce inflammation. The best oils to choose are those rich in non-inflammatory monounsaturated fat, such as olive oil, macadamia nuts and avocado. 🙂

        • http://www.caffeineinformer.com/ Ted

          Thanks for clarifying Sue, can you point to any studies that have explored this? Everything I have read praises coconut oil. Thanks 🙂

          • Sue

            Hi Ted,

            I happen to know this kind of stuff because I work for Zone Labs, Inc., directly with Dr. Barry Sears, the creator of the Zone Diet, and I hold a certification in Anti-Inflamnatory Nutrition. Here’s a reference: Suganami T, Tanimoto-Koyama K, Nishida J, Itoh M, Yuan X, Mizuarai S, Kotani H, Yamaoka S, Miyake K, Aoe S, Kamei Y, and Ogawa Y. “Role of the Toll-like receptor 4/NF-kappaB pathway in saturated fatty acid-induced inflammatory changes in the interaction between adipocytes and macrophages.” “Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 27” (2007): 84-91

            If you’re not into reading medical publications , you can gain an excellent basic knowledge about fatty acids and inflammation by reading “The Omega Rx Zone” and/or “Toxic Fat”, both written by Barry Sears, Ph.D. Both books contain extensive references.

            Sue

          • http://www.caffeineinformer.com/ Ted

            Thanks Sue! I have a Biology Degree so I read studies quite a bit for my work on various projects.

          • Sue

            Cool, and you’re welcome!

          • Jamie

            So is coconut oil no good? Because I love it! Definitely is always my oil of choice for anything that calls for oil.

          • http://www.caffeineinformer.com/ Ted

            I think coconut oil is fine and even healthy in moderate quantities so use it but also mix in others like olive oil and even grass fed butter. I always think diversity is healthier than sticking to only one source of anything.

          • Jamie

            Thanks! You’re probably right about diversity. I will make more of an effort to mix in other healthy fats.

  • Sue

    Hi Ted,

    I happen to know this kind of stuff because I work for Zone Labs, Inc., directly with Dr. Barry Sears, the creator of the Zone Diet, and I hold a certification in Anti-Inflamnatory Nutrition. Here’s a reference: Suganami T, Tanimoto-Koyama K, Nishida J, Itoh M, Yuan X, Mizuarai S, Kotani H, Yamaoka S, Miyake K, Aoe S, Kamei Y, and Ogawa Y. “Role of the Toll-like receptor 4/NF-kappaB pathway in saturated fatty acid-induced inflammatory changes in the interaction between adipocytes and macrophages.” “Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 27” (2007): 84-91

    If you’re not into reading medical publications , you can gain an excellent basic knowledge about fatty acids and inflammation by reading “The Omega Rx Zone” and/or “Toxic Fat”, both written by Barry Sears, Ph.D. Both books contain extensive references.

    Sue

  • spectra311

    These look awesome! I’ll admit, I think I would make the blueberries on the side and either eat them with yogurt or puree them into a sauce to pour on the eggs. I recently started buying my eggs from my husband’s friend (who raises chickens) and you can’t beat locally grown eggs from free range hens. The yolks are so amazingly thick and yellow–they shouldn’t even be lumped in with grocery store eggs.

    • http://www.caffeineinformer.com/ Ted

      I would definitely agree with the you there. And organic free range eggs have more omega 3, less cholesterol, and more beta carotene besides a much better taste.